By Victoria Cavaliere SEATTLE (Reuters) – A Washington state teenager who suffered life-long injuries when she was violently shaken as an infant has died, and a Seattle-area prosecutor said on Wednesday he would likely charge her biological father in her death. Baylee Duggins, 15, of Tacoma, died on Sunday from respiratory failure linked to pneumonia, according to her mother and the Pierce County Medical Examiner’s Office. Duggins’ biological father, Christopher Schwanz, was convicted in 2000 of second-degree child abuse for shaking the girl as an infant, leaving her severely physically and mentally impaired, according to Pierce County court records. Pierce County Prosecuting Attorney Mark Lindquist said he expects to bring a second-degree murder charge against Schwanz pending a review of the medical examiner’s evidence.

Source: news.yahoo.com

The answer to this growing problem?  Perhaps it’s all in the mapping.    

 

My video on the national distribution of this public health problem –     

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3c4A-oagjg     

 

(other child related public health issues are included as well on this page).       

 

Shaken baby.   

Teenage/childhood suicides.   

Bullying.   

 

These are the three most important socially and culturally related public health issues for 2015.     

 

Aside from not accomplishing much clinically in terms of surveilling this public health issue, very little has been done to evaluate it in  detail at the national spatial epidemiology level.    

 

If there are programs out there that are trying to aggressive research this social phenomenon locally and regionally, I would like to hear about these actual events.  With spatial statistics, we can evaluate these problems and search for the cultural and social "triggers" of these events, issues such as poverty, family unrest, sense of shame, day to day financial issues, inadequate social services programs . . .   I am more than ready to develop a national population health study project devoted to this topic.

See on Scoop.itNational Population Health Grid